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Monday, Aug. 18th, 2014

Tools For School Needs Your Help

Back to school time! Radio and television ads, store displays -- everywhere you go, reminding us it’s back-to-school time. It is an exciting time for kids and parents, but for families who are living paycheck-to-paycheck, back-to-school can be stressful. The cost of school supplies adds up fast and then, suddenly you realize your child has grown out of their only pair of nice pants! To relieve this financial stress, Family Promise of Gallatin Valley, The Salvation Army, and Bozeman Public Schools, with our new sponsor NorthWestern Energy, are teaming up to help low-income families get ready for the school year with Tools for School.
 
But, we need your help to make sure all of our youth are ready for school this year. Red Tools for School donation bins have been placed at businesses around town, including: Albertson’s, Rosauers, Safeway, Town & Country Foods on North 19th, Staples (both Bozeman locations), TJ Maxx, and Kmart. Donations needed include: lined paper, notebooks, pencils, pens, crayons, colored pencils, glue sticks, scissors, spiral notebooks, agendas, and backpacks.
 
To donate supplies, drop them in any of the bins around town, or deliver them directly to The Salvation Army located at 32 S. Rouse, from 1:30 - 3:00 pm, Monday through Thursday. Cash donations are also needed. Checks can be written to The Salvation Army. Indicate Tools for School in the memo line, and mail it to: The Salvation Army, PO Box 1307, Bozeman, MT 59771.
 
Families in need of school supply assistance can sign up at The Salvation Army from 1:30 to 3:00 pm Monday through Thursday, beginning August 18, 2014. Families will be contacted when supplies are ready for pick-up.
 
If you have any questions or would like additional information, please call Kara at 406/582-7388, Frank at 406/586-5813, or Anna at 406/522-6118.

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13th Annual “Cruisin’ on Main” Car Show Winners

The Downtown Bozeman Association, Cancer Support Community and our gracious event sponsors; Ressler Motors and Toyota of Bozeman, KBZK, Dark Horse Customs, Big Sky Collision Center, Nu2u!, Bozeman Lodge, Napa Auto Parts, Personalize It, The Bozeman Daily Chronicle, XL Country, TireRama, Northwestern Energy, Martel Construction, US Bank, Speedy Lube and Allegra Printing.are proud to present the 13th Annual “Cruisin’ on Main” Car Show Winners!  

We had over 275 entries this year, a record for the event, from around the region and awards in 13 categories as well as 1st, 2nd and 3rd in Best in Show and People’s Choice.  We estimated over 6,000 spectators throughout the day and look forward to another amazing Car Show in 2015!  And….are winners for 2014 are as follows:

1st Place Ford – 1956 Thunderbird, Wendy O’neil
1st Place Chevy – 1957 Chevy Bel-Air, Vicki and Rudy Grossman
1st Place Mopar – 1969 Plymouth Roadmaster, Dennis and Linda Nitschke
1st Place Pontiac – 1957 Pontiac Bonneville Convertible, Tom Gerrard
1st Place Original/Survivor –1961 Corvette, Nick and Audrey Stanis-Lawek
1st Place Antique – 1928 Imperial Model, Derek and Stacy Johnson
1st Place Street Rod/Custom – 1951 Buick Roadmaster, Frank and Robin Morris
1st Place Muscle Car – 1971 Chevy Chevelle, Shaun Carnalan
1st Place Truck – 1955 Chevy Pickup, Rick Frain
1st Place Motorcycle – 1914 Harley Davidson, Bob Fabian
1st Place Import – 1954 Porsche 356-Pre A, Jim and Francie Hasbrunck
1st Place Special Interest – 1964 Jaguar XKE, Mike Potter
1st Place Best 2000 – 2014 Corvette Stingray, Dan Jones
People Choice:
    1st Place – 1957 Pontiac Bonneville Convertible
    2nd Place – 1951 Buick Roadmaster, Frank and Robin Morris
    3rd Place – 1956 Chevy Bel-Air, Colleen Lewis
Best in Show:
    1st Place – 1914 Harley Davidson, Bob Fabian
    2nd Place – 1951 Buick Roadmaster, Frank and Robin Morris
    3rd Place – 1928 Imperial 80, Derrick and Stacy Johnston


For more information about the “Cruisin’ on Main” Car Show, contact Downtown Bozeman Association at  www.downtownbozeman.org or call us at 406-586-4008.  

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Monday, Aug. 11th, 2014

Visions West Gallery presents Binding Ties an exhibition of paintings by Theodore Waddell and Arin Waddell.

The exhibition will be displayed at Visions West Gallery in Bozeman from August 8th until September 10th, 2014. There will be a reception on the evening of the Art Walk on August 8th at 6:00 P.M. Theodore and Arin will be in attendance.
 
Showing works on paper spanning several decades, Theodore Waddell celebrates the landscape of the West and its relationship with the rancher and their herd of cattle. Using oil, encaustic, and graphite Waddell experiments with color and composition on paper. Perspective shifts from piece to piece with cows defined by negative space or just a few brushstrokes. Each painting offers a peek into his creative process. Waddell is a native Montanan cattle rancher and his paintings combine strong influence from the abstract expressionists whose legacy still prevailed in New York while he attended Brooklyn Museum Art School and figures like Frederic Remington, Albert Bierstadt, and Charles Russell who defined art of the American West. His work is collected by Museums across the country and resides in many important corporate and private collections.
 
Showing her work alongside Theodore Waddell is his daughter, Arin. Her paintings differ completely from her father’s although she claims the landscape of Montana as a strong influence. However, she’s more interested in flora and fauna and the human connection to the land. Her work examines relationships from unexpected perspectives, with a social and political edge, lightened by a dose of humor. An allegorical element enters her paintings, telling the viewer the beginning of a story but leaving enough unsaid for several endings. Her paintings have been shown in galleries and museums throughout the United States.
                                                                                                                      
For more information visit www.visionswestgallery.com or call 406.522.9946. Visions West Gallery is located at 34 West Main Street in Bozeman, MT and is open Monday through Saturday, 10 AM to 5:30 PM.

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Friday, Aug. 8th, 2014

Festival Fever

Good weather and great musicians combined for sweet success at two of this region’s favorite music festivals in July.

The fun began at Grand Targhee Resort with the 10th Annual Targhee Fest on July 18-20, and continued the next weekend at the Red Ants Pants Music Festival in White Sulphur Springs. These two festivals are as varied as the terrain they take place upon, perhaps lending to one observation by the producer of both festivals, Tom Garnsey, owner of Bozeman’s Vootie Productions. Garnsey said earlier this year that while Targhee Fest and the Red Ants Pants Music Festival are as different as apples and oranges, they are both delicious. He was right.

Ten Years Rockin’ the Tetons: Targhee Fest

Nestled in just below the jagged peaks of the Teton Range, Grand Targhee Resort (elevation 7,400 feet) offers a spectacular venue for a music festival, with plenty of room to camp within walking distance of the stage. The lineup at Targhee Fest was also spectacular this year, making it extremely difficult to pick a favorite act, and easy to sum up as the “best festival ever,” a description I heard time and time again (and could not disagree with). While Friday’s headliner Buddy Guy blew the crowd away with amazing guitar work and smoky vocals, the Royal Southern Brotherhood and the Wood Brothers also left many people impressed with their acts earlier that afternoon.

A cloudless Saturday morning greeted festival-goers at Targhee, along with the clip-clop of horses’ hoofs as groups headed out on morning rides. The breakfast smells of bacon and the like wafting across camp areas also served to stir folks out of sleep. Charlie Hunter and Scott Amendola hit the stage at noon, summoning the faithful to head to the venue. They were followed by Robert Earl Keen, Amy Helm and the Handsome Strangers (joined by Bill Payne on the keyboards), the Hard Working Americans, and the Chris Robinson Brotherhood. These outstanding bands got the crew primed for the final act on Saturday, Big Head Todd and the Monsters. It’s fair to say that Saturday’s Targhee Fest entertainment would have been a hard act to match.

It’s also fair to say that Sunday belonged to the girls at Targhee Fest. Sister Sparrow and the Dirty Birds got the ball rolling onstage at noon, followed by Nicki Bluhm and the Gramblers. Both these bands got the day started right. Trigger Hippy, featuring Joan Osborne and Jackie Greene, kept up the tempo, and the Tedeschi Trucks Band finished out the music on the main stage with style. But Bozeman’s Hooligans Band, featuring Garnsey on guitar and vocals and Bill Payne on keyboards, and joined by guest performers from the festival, sealed the deal on the first decade of Targhee Fest with an aftershow at the Trap Bar.

“The music was phenomenal, and the venue was perfect,” said Shannon Roberts of Bozeman, a first-timer this year at Targhee Fest. “We were down in front as much as possible. From the energy the bands were radiating, you could tell they loved being there.” Roberts also enthused about the venue in general and her fellow festival-goers in particular.

“Everyone was great, so friendly and respectful of other peoples’ camp areas, for instance,” she said. “It was my first Targhee Fest, but it certainly won’t be my last. I’ll be there next year.”

Red Ants in White Sulphur

The action shifted from the mountains to the meadows the following weekend at the 4th Annual Red Ants Pants  (RAP) Music Festival in White Sulphur Springs. Though this festival is less than five years old, it has already been ranked high in the list of the top 100 things to do in the Treasure State by the Great Falls Tribune (#22. Dance at the Red Ants Pants Music Festival in White Sulphur Springs: the Montana Bucket List).

The venue for the RAP festival, while not nestled away in the high peaks like Targhee, is in a high and wide prairie surrounded by mountain ranges on all sides. This festival begins in downtown White Sulphur Springs on Thursday night: the streets are shut down and live music begins. This year two bands with Livingston roots, Someday Miss Pray and The Bus Driver Tour, kept the street dance lively and got the festival rolling on a high note.

The music got rolling at the venue on the Jackson Ranch just north of town on Friday afternoon with The Hasslers, a Missoula-based band that was voted best band on the side stage last year, guaranteeing them a slot on the main stage this summer (Reports are that The Hasslers played long into the early morning hours in the camp area, to the delight of many and the chagrin of a very few). Jessie Veeder hit the main stage next, followed up by those hard-working Hooligans, who filled in for an ill Holly Williams, and Ian Tyson got the crowd warmed up well for Friday night’s headliner, Jason Isbell.

Tom Catmull’s Radio Static band got the festival started on Saturday, followed up by a band that was, for me, the big hit (and not totally unexpected) of the weekend, Baskery. Three sisters from Sweden comprise this alternative Americana band that wowed the RAP audience with their fresh, hard-driving sound and great stage performance. These girls should have a bright future in the music business. Retro rocker JD McPherson hit the main stage after Baskery, followed by the story-telling singer/songwriter James McMurtry. Matt Andersen kept the main stage hot for the smiling Josh Ritter, and Saturday’s headliner, Brandie Carlile, kept the audience animated with a delightful show and a real connection with the crowd.

It was warm on Sunday as the festival began to wind down, but the music stayed quite hot until the end. Red Molly, another female Americana trio, started the action on the main stage, followed by the hot sounds of the Black Lillies.

Three-time RAP festival favorite Corb Lund and his Hurtin’ Albertans returned to the main stage next, lighting a fire under a crowd undoubtedly growing weary as the festival wound down, and the festival grounds were still packed with people as Sunday’s headliner and country music legend Charley Pride made his way onto the main stage. Backed by a band of seasoned professionals, Pride did not disappoint the crowd gathered to hear him sing, and his performance was the perfect way to cap off another successful Red Ants Pants Music Festival.

While both Targhee Fest and the Red Ants Pants Music Festival have their roots in live performances, both events offer much more than music. Both events are considered to be family-friendly affairs, and both venues really showcase the some of the best scenery the region has to offer. See you on the festival trail!

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Monday, Aug. 4th, 2014

MSU's new Jabs Hall receives passive solar wall

A passive solar wall installed atop Montana State University’s new Jabs Hall could pay for itself in 10 years, reduce the amount of energy used to heat the building and provide valuable data to research engineers.
 
Installation of the solar wall, completed on Monday, is one of many sustainable technologies being used to reduce the building’s energy use and carbon footprint. Jabs Hall, which was made possible by a $25 million donation from MSU alumni Jake Jabs, is under construction and scheduled to open in the summer of 2015. It will be the new home of the Jake Jabs College of Business and Entrepreneurship.
 
The solar wall, which makes up the south-facing side of the building’s mechanical penthouse, will preheat fresh air coming into the building thereby reducing the amount of energy needed to heat the building.
 
“It’s simple, cost effective and will bring down the overall energy costs for Jabs Hall,” said Dan Stevenson, assistant director of MSU Facility Services. “And that is why it is a technology that is likely to be incorporated into almost every new building we see on campus. We replace the building’s skin with something that has energy performance built into it.”
 
The solar wall includes sensors that a research team from MSU’s College of Engineering will use to study how well the technology performs.
 
Kevin Amende, assistant professor of mechanical engineering technology, said the data his lab collects will be an asset to engineers and architects on future projects. Having the ability to monitor the way fresh air warmed with solar energy affects the building’s heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems will also be a great tool for teaching future engineers studying in MSU’s HVAC Lab, Amende added.
 
The research project, which is being launched by mechanical engineering technology junior Ben Listowich of Kingfield, Maine, will combine data collected from a weather station atop Jabs Hall with data collected from sensors at various points within the solar wall. By also tracking the building’s HVAC system, Amende said the study should offer a pretty good picture of how the technology is performing within three or four years.
 
“If we can show empirically that we can heat up the in-take air by 10 degrees, that will corroborate that the use of this technology can deliver real energy savings,” Amende said. “Best of all, we’ll have students working out real-world problems with what we are learning from the solar wall data.”
 
Listowich agreed.
 
“When I joined (the HVAC lab) as an undergraduate researcher, I definitely didn’t expect to be working on a project this large,” Listowich said. “I expected to be testing air handlers in the lab. Instead, I’m testing a system that could have a big impact on how buildings’ energy systems are designed at MSU.”
 
The use of passive solar, as well as ground-source heating and cooling from a series of nearby wells, helps the new building fall into line with MSU’s strategic goals for advancing sustainability on campus, Stevenson said. Sustainability at Jabs Hall comes from looking for common-sense solutions, Stevenson added. For example, the building’s south-facing orientation will combine with abundant state-of-the-art windows and smart lighting technology to reduce energy demand during daylight hours.  
 
Erik Renna, a 2002 grad from MSU’s College of Engineering who is now a mechanical engineer with Morrison-Maierle, said Jabs Hall should earn a LEED Gold certification for its environmentally friendly design. Morrison-Maierle is the mechanical engineering consultant for the Jabs Hall project.
 
“I think we are on track for gold, although we won’t know the final certification level until Jabs Hall is complete,” Renna said. “While the project mandate was for LEED Silver, we wanted to show that we could exceed that.”

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Friday, Jul. 25th, 2014

Montana Shakespeare in the Parks part of visit celebrating Bard’s 450 birthday

Montana Shakespeare in the Parks has been selected to be a part of “Shakespeare on the Road,” an international celebration of Shakespeare taking place across America in honor of Shakespeare’s 450th birthday.
 
A team from the University of Warwick and the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust based in Stratford-upon-Avon will visit Montana Shakespeare in the Parks Aug. 1-5 as part of a 60-day road trip visiting 14 Shakespeare-related theatre festivals across America. The team will attend performances of “As You Like It” at the Sweet Pea Festival in Bozeman on Aug. 3 and “Romeo and Juliet” on Aug. 4 in Philipsburg. There they hope to interview audience members about their experience with Shakespeare and Shakespeare in the Parks.
 
The “Shakespeare on the Road” team is made up of Paul Edmonson, head of research and knowledge from the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, and Paul Prescott, associate professor at the University of Warwick, along with media partners, AJ and Melissa Leon of Misfit, Inc.
 
The team began its journey in Kansas City on July 4 and hit the road to determine how Shakespeare is being performed and celebrated across the U.S.
 
The team will award MSIP a commemorative plaque to mark the visit and the project team will give presentations about its work and the work of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, the charity set up in Stratford-upon-Avon in 1847 to look after many of the world’s most important Shakespeare heritage sites.
 
In addition, MSIP will be invited to deposit material in the trust’s archives to create a permanent record of their activities. Regular updates on the visit will be blogged during the 60-day road trip. Edmonson and Prescott will also compile a book about their experiences.
 
“Shakespeare on the Road is about engaging with international communities who celebrate the world’s most famous playwright,” Edmonson said. “These are the people who make Shakespeare happen, year in year out.
 
“Every year almost three-quarters of a million people from around the world visit Shakespeare’s birthplace, and American tourists are a high proportion of these, so it’s a story of reverse pilgrimage, which we hope will start new conversations across the States.”
 
“The amount of Shakespearean theatre-making in America dwarves that of any other country, the U.K. included,” Prescott said. “Every summer, from sea to shining sea – and at all points in between – from spit and sawdust performances in local parks to slick professional productions in reconstructed Elizabethan playhouses, the Bard busts out all over the USA. This trip will take the pulse of Shakespeare in America over the course of one remarkable summer in 2014 and is a perfect way of celebrating his enduring popularity and the 450th anniversary of his birth.”
 
To follow the progress of Shakespeare on the Road, visit their website at www.shakespeareontheroad.com or follow them on Twitter at @bardintheusa. To learn more about Montana Shakespeare in the Parks, visit www.shakespeareintheparks.org.

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Submission deadline is Aug. 4 for MSU convocation writers' contest

Writers of short fiction, essays and poetry from throughout Montana are eligible for a $100 prize and to meet Shiza Shahid, CEO and co-founder of the non-profit Malala Fund, by entering the 2014 Montana State University Freshman Convocation Writer's Voice contest.
 
Entries, due at 5 p.m. Monday, Aug. 4,  should be inspired by the book “I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban.” Winners of the juried competition will meet Shahid at a reception to be held at 3 p.m. Aug. 25 at MSU's Renne Library. First-place winners will receive $100 gift cards. Second-place finishers will receive gift certificates from Country Bookshelf. The submitted work of all award-winning writers will be considered for publication.
 
The competition is open to all Montana K-12 students, MSU students from all campuses and Montana community members at large.
 
Submissions must be identified as short fiction, essay or poetry and may not be more than 1,500 words. Entries will be judged by a panel that includes MSU students, faculty and community members.
 
Entries should be emailed as an Adobe PDF file to convocation@montana.edu. All entries must be accompanied by a cover sheet that lists the contestant's name, telephone number, email address, whether the contestant is a student (including name of school) or community member, the title of the work, and whether the entry is short fiction, essay or poetry. Contestants may submit one entry per person.
 
This event is co-sponsored by the Bozeman Public Library Foundation. “I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban,” is the 2014 One Book One Bozeman selection. It is also co-sponsored by the Country Bookshelf and the MSU Writing Center.
 
More specific entry requirements may be found at: http://guides.lib.montana.edu/WritersVoice or contact Jan Zauha, MSU librarian, at 994-6554 or jzauha@montana.edu
 
Shahid is the speaker at the 2014 MSU Freshman Convocation, which will be held at 7:30 p.m. Monday, Aug. 25, in the MSU Fieldhouse. The event is free and open to the public; however, tickets must be reserved in advance for everyone planning to attend except for the members of the 2014 MSU freshman class. Tickets will be available July 30 at all Bobcat ticket outlets including: the Bobcat Ticket Office, Rosauers, the AskUs Desk at the SUB, by calling 994-CATS or (800)325-7328 and online at www.ticketswest.com.

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Montana Girls STEM funds eight Montana youth projects

Eight projects have received mini-grant funding from the Montana Girls STEM Collaborative Project through Montana EPSCoR, a National Science Foundation-funded partnership that includes Montana State University and the University of Montana.

The mini-grants seek to develop or grow programs that offer exposure to science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), with a focus on building collaboration between existing programs and organizations that will encourage girls to pursue STEM-related education and careers. Funding for the grants was given in partnership with the Women’s Foundation of Montana.

The projects are:

In Bozeman:
    •    The Gallatin Girls Coding Club will work with the Children’s Museum of Bozeman to launch an innovative high-touch club that engages girls in the joy and beauty of coding. GGCC will help girls acquire valuable skills in a safe and structured environment, gain confidence in their ability to create beautiful and functional code, and can inspire them to pursue further education and careers the STEM fields;
    •    Hyalite STEM Club is based at Hyalite Elementary School in Bozeman. Working with engineers from McKinstry, the after-school school club will meet monthly to focus on creating a working greenhouse classroom. The students will conduct an energy audit of their school and learn about conceptional design, site location and sustainability.

In Butte:
    •    Montana Gems is an after-school STEM program for girls in grades 5-8 based at Montana Tech in Butte. The participating girls will conduct hands-on STEM activities and develop science fair projects. The experience will culminate in a multi-day summer camp experience featuring guest scientists and technologists. Montana Gems will take place in partnership with Montana Tech’s Create Math: Mathematics and Music Summer Experience.

In Great Falls:
    •    LittleBigPlanet Club in Great Falls will offer a video game development camp for girls. Working in partnership with the Paris Gibson Square Museum of Art and Team KAIZEN (Montana’s first PlayStation-certified game studio), the camp will include real world game development and help students see how their passion in gaming can translate to a fulfilling career in the game industry.

In Missoula:
    •    The University of Montana’s PJW College of Education and Human Sciences and the UM Paleontology Center will collaborate to create a YouTube STEM Channel that features female role models demonstrating various STEM topics including fossils, exoplanets, oceans and many others. High school girls will help produce, edit and review films. The project is in collaboration with spectrUM Discovery Area;
    •    The SciGirls After-school Astronomy Club is an afterschool program partnership between the Girl Scouts of Montana & Wyoming and the University of Montana’s Department of Physics and Astronomy. Activities will include a tour of the night sky in spectrUM Discovery Area’s Starlab, outdoor stargazing with UM astronomers and their telescopes, Native American storytelling, SciGirls light pollution activities, and an array of self-guided art and astronomy experiences.  The club will culminate with a “night at the museum event” where girls get to stay the night at spectrUM Discovery Area.

In Philipsburg:
    •    Montana Trout Unlimited, in partnership with the Big Sky Watershed Corps, received scholarship funds to send five girls to Fly Fishing and Conservation Camp near Georgetown Lake outside of Philipsburg. The camp strives to educate girls about fly fishing, fly tying, conservation and stream restoration and will feature expert speakers sharing knowledge on water quality, watershed management, trout habitat, insect life, fly casting, stream etiquette and more.

Reed Point:
    •    The Reed Point STEM Club will offer a robotics camp for youth in grades 3-8. This summer’s camp will focus on robotic surgery, and participants can choose an area of personal interest, whether human or animal surgery.
The Montana Girls STEM Collaborative is part of the National Science Foundation-funded National Girls Collaborative Project with hubs at Montana State University’s Extended University and at the University of Montana’s spectrum Discovery Area. The group’s Website is: http://bit.ly/MontanaGirlsSTEM and the group is on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/MontanaGirlsSTEM.

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Wednesday, Jul. 23rd, 2014

MSU’s online Native American Studies courses now open for fall registration

Montana State University’s online courses in Native American studies are now open for fall registration, including two graduate courses and one undergraduate course.
Students do not have to be enrolled in an MSU program of study in order to take the courses.

“Montana Indian Culture, History and Current Issues” (NASX 232) offers three undergraduate credits and is taught by Department of Native American head Walter Fleming. The course covers the establishment of Montana's reservations; treaties and agreements with the federal government; contemporary tribal governments; and social structures including kinship, political affiliations, military, warrior societies and religion.

Fleming has taught at MSU for over 30 years and was raised on the Northern Cheyenne Reservation. He is an enrolled member of the Kickapoo Tribe in Kansas.
“Native America: Dispelling the Myths” (NASX 550) is a three-credit graduate course exploring the various “myths” commonly held by non-Indians and sometimes Indians alike. Students will wrestle with these preconceptions while learning the most basic elements of American Indian—which is to say American—history.

The instructor is Francine Spang-Willis, a Northern Cheyenne tribal member who grew up on the Northern Cheyenne Reservation in Montana. She has a master’s in Native American Studies and a college teaching certificate from MSU-Bozeman. As former director of the American Indian Tribal Histories Project, she has extensive experience in oral tradition. She currently helps the U.S. Forest Service’s Heritage Program protect and maintain pre-historic and historic sites in the Gallatin National Forest.

“Indigenous Nations of Montana” (NASX 552) is a three-credit graduate course offering an introduction to Montana’s contemporary indigenous nations, including exploration of the 11 tribes resident on Montana reservations, as well as the Little Shell, who are without a federally recognized homeland. With instructor Shane Doyle, students will start in the east with the Nakoda, or Assiniboine, and work their way through the state clockwise, finishing up with the A’aninin, or White Clay, in the north. The course examines the traditional culture and history of each tribe, with a strong focus on contemporary life and issues.

Doyle is a Crow tribal member originally from Crow Agency. He holds a bachelor’s in elementary education, a masters in Native American studies and an doctorate in curriculum and instruction. He is also a singer of traditional Plains Indian style music.

These online classes run from Aug. 25 to Dec. 12.
Students who go on to earn an online or campus degree or certificate, including the online graduate certificate in Native American Studies or the online bachelor's degree completion program in Liberal Studies, may be able to apply these credits toward their program. Students interested in this option should speak with an MSU academic advisor.

To register or read more about the courses, visit MSU's Extended University at http://eu.montana.edu/online/courses. All courses are listed under Native American Studies. For more information, contact Janine Hansen at jhansen@montana.edu or call (406) 994-6683.

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The Brothers Comatose at Sweet Pea Festival 2014

Literal brothers, Alex (banjo and vocals) and Ben Morrison (guitar and vocals) of The Brothers Comatose grew up in a house that was known for its music parties. “The Morrison house was a gathering place for local musicians – everyone would bring an instrument, call out tunes, call out changes, and just play for hours” says Brothers Comatose bassist and Morrison music party goer, Gio Benedetti. “I learned more in that living room than in any class I ever took.” The brothers took this generous, inclusive and rowdy attitude and brought it to stages all over San Francisco. With the addition of members Philip Brezina (fiddle) and Ryan Avellone (mandolin) the string quintet brings their original string music and the feel of an intimate music party to audiences all across the United States.

The environment the band creates with their music and their live shows isn't the exclusive band vs. crowd world of rock and pop, but rather the sing-along, stomp-along, inclusive world that gave birth to string band music. The band – while playing festivals like Hardly Strictly Bluegrass, Strawberry, High Sierra, Outside Lands, Kate Wolf, and SXSW, - has not lost sight of their roots, their fans and the relationships that have brought them where they are.

Despite their name, the band is anything but Comatose. They toss alligators (inflatable) into the crowd, they hand out chopsticks for audience-percussion-participation, and are known to jump down and play acoustic encores in the middle of the crowd at the end of a set. It's just one, big, extended Morrison music party. Only now, the living room travels via Chevy G20 Conversion Van from state to state.

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